Juan G. Jiménez Sánchez

Juan G. Jiménez Sánchez

BEHANCEINSTAGRAM

Happy Animation
Juan Gabriel Jiménez ~ Behance

How did you discover your love and talent for creating art? 

It all happened when I was in elementary school. My experience of bullying at an early age and the constant worry of not complying with the school’s curriculum marked an impact on my performance. Growing up I very much avoided social interaction, would rather pass recess time and hide in the hallway of the school’s library. I wouldn’t discuss my thoughts verbally, to anyone that approached me, I had to draw out my thoughts to communicate. That’s when I was then able to begin exploring art and this medium of drawing helped me become aware that through creating art I’m communicating. 


How did you discover your love and talent for creating art? 

It all happened when I was in elementary school. My experience of bullying at an early age and the constant worry of not complying with the school’s curriculum marked an impact on my performance. Growing up I very much avoided social interaction, would rather pass recess time and hide in the hallway of the school’s library. I wouldn’t discuss my thoughts verbally, to anyone that approached me, I had to draw out my thoughts to communicate. That’s when I was then able to begin exploring art and this medium of drawing helped me become aware that through creating art I’m communicating. 

Through my social media presence, I am able to share my love of art and connect with other local artists. I’ve connected with the community by sharing.


How has your culture shaped who you are as an artist or how you express your creativity? 

When I was a student at the Art League of San Juan here in Puerto Rico, my instructor at the time introduced me to the importance of researching other artists and their aesthetics to understand the importance of developing my own techniques. One of the artists I admire the most from the Pop art era is Jean-Michel Basquiat. His work, Dusthead and Scull were some of his consistent artworks that inspired me to explore color theory, shapes and urban style and portraits. La Mujer Urbana (“The Urban Woman”), is an original painting of mine; it’s the exploration of urban style through portraiture of an unknown scenario. A portrayal of a woman wandering in an abstract city, leaving us to admire her stillness gives thought to the expression on the portrait. My love for urban brings me to the city of Santurce, Puerto Rico; filled with it’s graffiti art, murals and tabloid art. I find it inspiring till this day by the variety of works with a peculiar aesthetic. After college I continued painting whenever I had time. I took a big interest in painting landscapes: beach, mountains. It was one of the things I missed the most about Puerto Rico when I lived in Savannah. 


How has art helped you connect to your community? 

Network; connect with other artists and collaborate in any way possible. This is the best way to build a relationship and wisdom. It is rewarding to share the same passion.

Through my social media presence, I am able to share my love of art and connect with other local artists. I’ve connected with the community by sharing. Few times throughout high school 2008, I participated in contests organized for local young artists to showcase my painting skills. In 2011, senior year I won honorary mention at this contest hosted by Puerto Rican attorney, Pedro Pierluisi where I had the privilege to meet him. After graduating in 2015 from the SCAD in Savannah, GA., I returned to Puerto Rico to use my talent to work as a motion grapher, freelancing and doing collaborations. I’ve worked in private and local marketing agencies, producing animations for various clients which helps keep me connected to other local arts and learn from them as well. 


What would you say to young people wanting to pursue a career in art or further develop their artistic talents? 

1.Commit to your job. You’re going to eventually have more than one boss in the lifeline and it’s easy to lose motivation and direction if it is not accomplished like told. Build a thick skin and embrace failures in order to become a better individual. 

2. Create your niche. There’s no guide, but it really helps if you make it your own, again you have to put in the effort. There are endless opportunities in the arts spectrum; make use of them. 

3. Network; connect with other artists and collaborate in any way possible. This is the best way to build a relationship and wisdom. It is rewarding to share the same passion. We are all artists in some form or the other, some just like to draw in sticks and circles. Solidarity.